Lucrecia Martel was born in Salta, Argentina in 1966. As the sister of seven siblings, she grew up in a middle-class family. She became infatuated with Latin languages and Greek Mythology, even going as far as enrolling in a Catholic school only to study such subjects. By the age of 15, she discovered film. Not the art of film, but the literal action of grabbing a camera and filming her surroundings. Her family, conversations, and daily, mundane happenings were captured by a young Martel. Little did she knew back then, that 20 years later, she would release her debut feature…


Lee Chang-dong’s 2018 film, Burning, left me shivering quietly for hours after I finished it. To this day, actually, I can still remember watching the final pulsating moments of the film for the first time. I was glued to the screen, unable to look away.

The story is based off of Haruki Murakami’s short story, Barn Burning, published in The New Yorker magazine in 1992. Lee’s adaptation starts off with Jong-su (Yoo Ah-in), a young delivery guy and aspiring writer who lives isolated from urban society in a lonely house on the outskirts of Seoul. His journey begins when, while…


I knew almost instantly what kind of movie Barb and Star Go to Vista del Mar was going to be. I just had to take one look at Kristen Wiig in what I can only describe as Cate Blanchette playing a caricature-esque Bond villain. I had only seen a teaser trailer and the poster, and to be honest it does kind of encapsulate the whole aesthetic and vibe of the film that I was about to see. I just couldn’t anticipate the whole thing, or just how far they would end up going. And no, Morgan Freeman voicing a talking…


The legal drinking age in Denmark is 18; that is, to be served alcohol in a bar or restaurant. However, 16 is the legal age to purchase alcohol from stores. Also, it is completely okay to go to a public park to consume it. Thomas Vinterberg’s latest film explores the controversial subject of alcohol consumption, and just how far it can go.

Another Round opens with a montage of Danish teenagers during an evening of binge drinking, running around parks, blasting music and basically all-out partying in public spaces. They even handcuff a police officer to a subway rail. …


Euphoria creator Sam Levinson has brought us the first movie to be written, shot and released during the pandemic. Malcolm & Marie, if anything else, proves that artistic expression can be done even in the toughest of times. For this small scale production, Levinson didn’t go too far. He recruited most of his Euphoria crew, from Marcell Rév as cinematographer to Julio Perez as editor, so the two projects share many similar crew members. Surprisingly, this doesn’t result in a complete copy of Euphoria’s aesthetic nor style. This always feels like its very own thing, except for a few inspirations.


1970s crime movies have always been notoriously centered around men. That could also be said about the crime genre in general, but its the 70s that have a kind of macho aura to it: gangsters, drugs, New York, detectives, lots of blood. Women were always present, but usually sidelined as the trophy wife, the love interest, or victims of murder. Truth is, those movies were trying to mimic how crime really worked at the time, although it was usually romanticized, and the men in these movies are depicted as figures of power, people to be respected because they were criminals…


Thirty-six years after the Talking Heads released Stop Making Sense (1984), one of the most influential and beloved concert films of all time, former lead singer, David Byrne, managed to come back to the stage in an even weirder, crazier and more relevant way than before. I’ll start by saying that I’m a big fan of both Talking Heads and Johnathan Demme’s work on Stop Making Sense. Sure, there are many similarities between these two, mostly because Byrne’s usual energy is still as present here as it was then. I believe this is a film everyone can enjoy, even if…


Few anime films have left me an impression as beautiful yet melancholic as Makoto Shinkai’s Your Name (2016). For starters, I immediately found that mixture of nature with society here. The sharp contrast between the bright greens of Itomori, a fictional rural town, and the silver shine of the urban mega city that is Tokyo; both bound through a beautiful electric blue sky. Now that I’m going on about the animation, there is a particularly great scene around the one hour mark where the animation style is changed for a bit. …


WARNING: Spoilers ahead

The word I’d use to best describe Jason Reitman’s Men, Women & Children would be, frankly, bad. It’s clear early on that the movie will be a sort of cautionary tale on the dangers of the internet and social media. The movie was released in 2014, a year in which Facebook, Twitter, and many other platforms had already exploded into everyone’s screen. The new iPhone 6 had also just come out, and Apple was at its most popular. Reitman’s film actually does address some interesting and very real issues here, but it was apparently he could not…


I wasn’t expecting to be so touched after watching Darius Marder’s Sound of Metal. I chose not to watch the trailer beforehand, instead only reading a brief plot description, and was immediately intrigued by the film.

Ruben, played by Riz Ahmed, is the drummer of a heavy metal band duo alongside his girlfriend and lead singer, Lou (Olivia Cooke). They live in very modest RV that conveniently allows them to travel around the country on their tours. The viewer learns this information during the first few minutes of the film with little to no exposition. …

Raul Flores

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